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International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies

“And There'll Be NO Dancing”. Perspectives on Policies Impacting Indigenous Australia Since 2007

Abstract

“Sexual abuse of children is inexcusable. So why is there such a fuss about a state intervention? Should we shut up and do nothing just because there is racism? No child or woman must be molested, irrespective of who the perpetrator is!” Thus my recollection of what one of my Scottish colleagues said in an informal conversation about the 2007 Northern Territory Intervention, a set of legal and political measures intended to curtail domestic violence in Indigenous Australian communities. “Yes”, I replied, “race should not be an issue when talking about crime”. Not least because domestic violence happens everywhere, including Scotland. I would not have heard anyone talking about a specifically Scottish, White or European propensity for domestic violence. Yet there is abundant talk about Black violence. Generalisation is the hallmark of racialisation. Blackness is scripted as inherently violent—a tenacious trope deriving from colonial concepts of ferocious animalism (e.g. Eze 2000; Nederveen-Pieterse 1990).

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Published:
Pages:1 to 3
Section: Book Reviews
How to Cite
Haag, O. (2017). “And There’ll Be NO Dancing”. Perspectives on Policies Impacting Indigenous Australia Since 2007. International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies, 10(1), 1-3. https://doi.org/10.5204/ijcis.v10i1.150